Science Fiction & Fantasy

Latest Science Fiction Story

Surfacing

Mishy had lived in the undersea city for twenty years. When she went down in the submersible, she was very young and very frightened, all bones and worries, but the years under the water did not feel like they had aged her on the inside. It was only when she had to look at the others that she could see that she was different after all.

Latest Fantasy Story

The Way Home

The demon, like all the others before it, appeared first in the form of a horizontal plume of rust-red grit and vapor. Almost a kilometer away, it moved low to the ground, camouflaged by the waves of hot, shimmering air that rose from the desert hardpan. Lieutenant Matt Whitebird watched it for many seconds before he was sure it was more than a mirage. Then he announced to his squad, “Incoming.”

PERSONA by Genevieve Valentine

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Latest Editorial

Editorial, March 2015

Make sure to read the Editorial for all our news and updates, as well as a run-down of this month’s content.

More Science Fiction Stories

The Brains of Rats

There is evidence that Joan of Arc was a man. Accounts of her trial state that she did not suffer the infirmity of women. When examined by the prelates prior to her incarceration, it was found that she lacked the characteristic escutcheon of women. Her pubic area, in fact, was as smooth and hairless as a child’s.

(available on 3/10) Buy Issue

Hot Rods

The winds blow pretty regular across the dried-up lake. Traction’s good — when luck’s on your side you can reach three hundred KPH or faster. Harper watches the hot rods race on thick white salt so pure and bright the satellites use it for colour calibration. Harper doesn’t care about souped-up hot rods.

(available on 3/17) Buy Issue

The New Atlantis

Coming back from my Wilderness Week, I sat by an odd sort of man in the bus. For a long time we didn’t talk; I was mending stockings and he was reading. Then the bus broke down a few miles outside Gresham. Boiler trouble, the way it generally is when the driver insists on trying to go over thirty. It was a Supersonic Superscenic Deluxe Longdistance coal-burner, with Home Comfort, that means a toilet, and the seats were pretty comfortable.

(available on 3/24) Buy Issue

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A Face of Black Iron

Diomedo Obron and the Archon Filidor passed the evening and much of the night in the latter’s study, discussing the next day’s journey into the wastes of Barran and the expected confrontation with whatever survivor of the Nineteenth Aeon wizards’ cabal still lurked in the Seventh Plane. Erm Kaslo struggled to try to understand the concepts the two thaumaturges threw onto the table — sometimes literally.

(available on 3/10) Buy Issue

The Good Son

I don’t just want to be with you. I want to live with you. In the kingdom under the hill, we could have been together forever. I didn’t want that. I wanted you — all of you. But that was before I understood what that meant.

(available on 3/17) Buy Issue

Documentary

Kamaria turns into a helicopter gunship at the full metal moon. She stalks the fallow killing fields by night, chop-chop lost in the wind. Helicopter thoughts are slick with oil, but she will not fire her guns. That much she holds in place, like a single sputtering candle underneath the roar of her blades.

(available on 3/24) Buy Issue

More Nonfiction

Interview: Patrick Rothfuss

Patrick Rothfuss is the author of the epic fantasy trilogy, The Kingkiller Chronicle. The first two books, THE NAME OF THE WIND and THE WISEMAN’S FEAR, are out now. His latest book, THE SLOW REGARD OF SILENT THINGS, is a novella set in the same world.

(available on 3/10) Buy Issue

Book Reviews: March 2015

This month, Amal El-Mohtar reviews work from Lisa M. Bradley, Jennifer Marie Brissett, and Sonya Taaffe.

(available on 3/17) Buy Issue

Artist Showcase: Wylie Beckert

Chance plays a major role in my compositions — sometimes it’s the only thing to fall back on when my imagination fails me and all my ideas start to look the same. Studying natural, randomized elements like tree bark or smoke helps remind me that shapes don’t need to be precise or carefully planned to be beautiful — borrowing from these sketches and snapshots provides a wealth of new ideas.

(available on 3/24) Buy Issue