Science Fiction & Fantasy

Beren & Luthien by J.R.R. Tolkien

Advertisement

Dec. 2015 (Issue 67)

This month, we have original science fiction by A. Merc Rustad (“Tomorrow When We See the Sun”) and Aidan Doyle (“Beneath the Silent Stars”), along with SF reprints by Hugh Howey (“Beacon 23: Little Noises”) and Charlie Jane Anders (“The Time Travel Club”). Plus, we have original fantasy by Rachel Swirsky (“Tea Time”) and the late Jay Lake (“Ex Libris Noctis”), and fantasy reprints by Richard Parks (“The Queen’s Reason”) and Mark Rigney (“Portfolio”). All that, and of course we also have our usual assortment of author and artist spotlights, along with an interview with THE MARTIAN author Andy Weir, and the latest installation of our book review column. For our ebook readers, we also have a reprint of the novella “The Surfer” by Kelly Link, and a novel excerpt from A DAUGHTER OF NO NATION by A.M. Dellamonica.

In This Issue: Dec. 2015 (Issue 67)

Editorial

Editorial, December 2015

Be sure to read the Editorial for all our news and updates, as well as a run-down of this month’s content.

Science Fiction

Tomorrow When We See the Sun

Wolflord (title): nomadic, nameless survivors of destroyed warships; those who did not accept ritual immolation during the Decommission. No allegiance to the Principality; outlaws. The antiquated title is self-taken from the first deserter, whose name and memory were erased upon execution; precise origin unknown.

Fantasy

The Queen’s Reason

The courtiers and servants did their best to conceal the truth, but that was a losing battle. The final straw, so to speak, was when their beautiful young queen managed to elude her Ladies in Waiting and greet the South Islands Confederation ambassador while wearing only a skirt made of broom straw and a gardenia pot for a hat. After that incident there was little point in denying the obvious: Mei Janda II, newly crowned Queen of Lucosa, was barking mad.

Author Spotlight

Author Spotlight

Science Fiction

Beacon 23: Little Noises

They don’t prepare you for the little noises. They put you in a centrifuge until you pass out, ride you up and down parabolic curves until you puke your stomach lining, poke you with needles until you know what an addict feels like, and make you learn three fields of physics and get a medical degree while training for triathlons.

Fantasy

Tea Time

Begin at the beginning: His many hats. Felt derbies in charcoal and camel and black. Sporting caps and straw boaters. Gibuses covered in corded silk for nights at the theatre. Domed bowlers with dashingly narrow brims. The ratty purple silk top hat, banded with russet brocade, that he keeps by his bedside.

Author Spotlight

Author Spotlight

Artist Showcase

Artist Showcase: James Ng

James Ng was born in Hong Kong in 1985. After high school, he received a scholarship to attend the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, then completed his Bachelor of Fine Arts at the School of Visual Arts in New York, majoring in illustration. He works as a freelance concept artist and illustrator for games, books and comics. He lives in Hong Kong but travels often to the United States for work and exhibitions. His website is jamesngart.com.

Science Fiction

Beneath the Silent Stars

Jean-Paul crawled out of storage and stretched his arms and legs. He avoided going into storage whenever he could help it, but the ship had insisted this time. “Hello, Jean-Paul,” Unattributed Source said. “I woke you as soon as we arrived within visual range of Amala.”

Fantasy

Portfolio

This is the incomplete story of Paints, grandson of Paints No More. It begins in shadow. Like this: As far as reincarnation goes, I became a believer on the day that I found a dead mole in my Gran’s stuffy one-car garage. The old Volvo had obviously run the mole over, or at least its back half; the head and forearms still looked ready to rise and crawl away.

Author Spotlight

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Book Reviews: December 2015

In this month’s column, we review Radiance, by Catherynne M. Valente, The Buried Giant, by Kazuo Ishiguro, and Bone Swans, by C. S. E. Cooney.

Science Fiction

The Time Travel Club

Nobody could decide what should be the first object to travel through time. Malik offered his car keys. Jerboa held up an action figure. But then Lydia suggested her one-year sobriety coin, and it seemed too perfect to pass up. After all, the coin had a unit of time on it, as if it came from a realm where time really was a denomination of currency. And they were about to break the bank of time forever, if this worked.

Fantasy

Ex Libris Noctis

Beatrice’s heart skipped and skipped again, the tiny pistons clattering in their brassbound prison. Her ribs ached, and there were narrow darts of pain throughout her chest. She was dying.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Interview: Andy Weir

I think I was doomed to be a nerd, because my father is a particle physicist and my mother was an electrical engineer. My dad had an infinite supply of 1950s and ’60s science fiction novels. It’s interesting, in that the SF that I read when I was growing up was one generation off of what you’d expect for my age. I grew up reading baby-boomer SF. My holy trinity of authors is Asimov, Clarke, and Heinlein.