Science Fiction & Fantasy

IntheNightWood-Banner-new1

Advertisement

Aug. 2018 (Issue 99)

Our cover story this month is an original science fiction short by Sarah Grey (“A Bond as Deep as Starlit Seas”), illustrated by Waiji Choo. We also have original SF from Alex Irvine (“The Atonement Path”), along with SF reprints by Bruce McAllister (“Angels”) and Dominica Phetteplace (“Project Extropy”). Plus, we have original fantasy by Manuel Gonzales (“Scavenge, Rustic Hounds!”) and Kate Elliott (“A Compendium of Architecture and the Science of Building”), and fantasy reprints by Sheree Renée Thomas (“Treesong”) and Dennis Danvers (“Here’s What I Know”). All that, and of course we also have our usual assortment of author spotlights, along with our book and media review columns. For our ebook readers, we also have the ebook-exclusive reprint of the SF novella “Native Seeds,” by Catherine Wells. Our book excerpt this month comes from Sam Hawke’s debut novel, City of Lies.

In This Issue: Aug. 2018 (Issue 99)

Editorial

Editorial: August 2018

Be sure to check out the editorial for all our news, updates, and a rundown of this month’s content.

Science Fiction

A Bond as Deep as Starlit Seas

Don’t sell her. The thought rises like a tide in the back of Jeri’s mind, where she’s spent three Nikutan launch cycles struggling to contain it. It leaves her breathless, drowning in guilt, and trying to hide it from the krosuta-whitened stare of the Henza abbess. This is Cleo, not a load of ore. This will break her. And how could it not break her? She’s a lumbering old Juno-class cargo beast, poor Cleo, one of the earliest models.

Author Spotlight

Fantasy

Treesong

If you have a worry your heart can’t seem to hold, take your troubles to the trees, my grandmama would say. That was in the Old Time, when I was a small girl with scraped knees and ashy legs, a neck full of sun. Her words would comfort me as I grew older, my baby fat yielding to strong woman curves and hips. Then I would fling my arms around my secret tree and whisper my sorrows into her knotty breast.

Science Fiction

Angels

The creature she’d had them make cost her the last piece of forest outside Siena. The one with the little medieval chapel in it, the tall umbrella pines shading a forest floor no tourist had ever walked upon. It cost her the two rocky islands just south of Elba, and the lead mines at Piombino, which she had never cared about, and the villa on Lake Garda, which she had, because, so small and intimate, it had been one of her father’s favorites.

Fantasy

Scavenge, Rustic Hounds!

The creatures come out at night, while we’re asleep. My husband says they are harmless. “Probably mice,” he says. “They’re not harmless,” I tell him. “They are very much not harmless,” I say. “They’re gathering information on us. They’re looking through our things, examining our lives, deciding if we are good or if we are not.” “That’s ridiculous,” my husband says. “They’re singling us out. Deciding which ones to take away.”

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Book Reviews: August 2018

This month, LaShawn M. Wanak reviews a pair of novellas by Martha Wells: The Murderbot Diaries: Artificial Condition and The Murderbot Diaries: Rogue Protocol. She also takes a look at the re-release of Tade Thompson’s novel Rosewater and new collection of short fiction by Nick Mamatas: The People’s Republic of Everything.

Science Fiction

The Atonement Path

To think we used to put young criminals in jail. I’m sorry. I don’t mean to eavesdrop. Or should I say eaveswatch? What is the comparable term for using one’s visual sense in a surreptitious fashion? Dining establishments are a superb venue for such observations. But it is true, no? What good could their example do if they were shut away from public view? Ah. I am being rude. My name is Andrew Blankenship. Esquire, in the interest of completeness.

Author Spotlight

Fantasy

Here’s What I Know

Here’s what I know: When Mom discovered she was pregnant with me, my parents had been separated for some time. Dad had left her for another woman in another town, and Mom had filed for divorce. I was conceived during a short-lived Christmas reunion. Dad wanted her to get an abortion. She refused. On the eve of the date when the divorce would’ve become final, Dad caught a train back to New York.

Nonfiction

Media Reviews: August 2018

This month reviewer Christopher East takes us on a tour of new genre television from around the world.

Science Fiction

Project Extropy

The first time God spoke to Akiko, she was a passenger aboard a container ship with no memory of how she got there. She was in the Pacific, headed for California. The ship was two weeks into its journey, but Akiko had only two days’ worth of memory.
Akiko was in the possession of several languages, though none of them felt like her mother tongue. She could address the crew in English or Russian or Tagalog, and though they seemed to understand what she was saying, they didn’t want to speak to her.

Fantasy

A Compendium of Architecture and the Science of Building

By the time he returned home after all his years of wandering, Magnus Diarisso had come to prefer a fire burning on cold days rather than the elaborate hypocaust system that heated the mage house. The sound of wood settling, sparks popping, and ashes sighing helped him relax. He told his nephew the mansa, the powerful cold mage who was head of Four Moons House, that he did not want to live in the main house with its comings and goings and the children’s chatter.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Interview: P. Djèlí Clark

Born in New York and raised mostly in Houston, P. Djèlí Clark spent the formative years of his life in the homeland of his parents, Trinidad and Tobago. His writing has appeared in Daily Science Fiction, Heroic Fantasy Quarterly, Lightspeed, Tor.com, and print anthologies including Griots I and II, Steamfunk, Myriad Lands Volume 2, and Hidden Youth.