Science Fiction & Fantasy

Baldree_Lattes-and-Legends_Lightspeed-728x90

Advertisement

Nov. 2022 (Issue 150)

We have original science fiction by Tania Fordwalker (“Beyond the Shore”) and Ben H. Winters (“Double Occupancy”). We also have a flash piece (“Therefore What the Multiverse has Joined Together, Let No One Separate”) from Dominica Phetteplace, along with an SF reprint by Tobias S. Buckell (“The Blindfold”). Plus, we have original fantasy by Alex Irvine (“The Dragon’s Hand”) and Kristina Ten (“The Noon Witch Goes to Sound Planet”). We also have a flash piece (“What If the Whole Camp of Kids Learned How To Liquefy?”) from Maria Kelson. Our fantasy reprint is by Yoon Ha Lee (“The Graphology of Hemorrhage”). All that, and of course we also have our usual assortment of author spotlights, along with book reviews from our terrific review team. Our ebook readers will also enjoy a book excerpt from Everina Maxwell’s new novel Ocean’s Echo.

In This Issue: Nov. 2022 (Issue 150)

Editorial

Editorial: November 2022

Be sure to check out the editorial for a run-down of this month’s terrific content.

Science Fiction

Beyond the Shore

Nobody noticed the first few. They walked. One by one, in the beginning. Isolated instances. On every continent, mid-meal, mid-shower, mid-work, mid-fuck, right out the door of a pulled-up car in the middle of a freeway—ordinary people turned their backs on their ordinary lives and walked. They walked, shedding their hair in clumps along the way, sloughing their skin in translucent sheets to reveal pale grey beneath. On bleeding feet they walked down highways and lanes and trails, unerringly taking the path of least resistance to the nearest coast. They crossed the sand. The sea cooled their aching calves. Still, they walked.

Fantasy

What If the Whole Camp of Kids Learned How To Liquefy?

When she melts, it’s like a balloon collapsing, but fast. Her body turns to an inky puddle, a pool of shadow. Then, in a snap, she goes clear. Shimmering. When all the other children are asleep, when the guard is looking at something else, when the camera eye is on something else. That’s when this happens. When she becomes a shadow, then a shimmer, and slithers out from under her thin silver blanket, onto the ground. She can slide, fast fast, between gray sleep mats with kids snoring, gray sleep mats with kids crying, she can slide past a gray sleep mat where one boy pulls up the corner to bang his head on the concrete floor.

Author Spotlight

Fantasy

The Blindfold

I’ve got a mother that wants to get in on a long-term financing agreement to change her son’s race for a trial, Ecstasy pings you. His court date is coming up; the hearing for the random race generator is next Thursday. Thursday. That doesn’t leave a lot of time. But, then, that’s why E is pinging you. They’re paying in cryptocurrency, Ecstasy says. My commission is the usual 10 percent. They’ve already set up the chain; you just need to agree to be on the other side. Local judicial computer systems have shit security. It’s always been the case.

Fantasy

The Dragon’s Hand

A boy traveling alone was beset by bandits on the outskirts of a strange town at sunset. They left him stripped and bloody in a ditch by the side of the road in the deepening dusk, as a bright full moon appeared over the trees. The boy watched it moving across the sky, his pain and shame a kind of trance. For a long time nothing happened. When he heard footsteps on the road, he was afraid, but something was broken inside him and he dared not disturb it by moving. Still he looked up at the moon, filling himself with its light. He felt a distance growing between himself and his body. The traveler’s steps paused.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Book Review: Liar, Dreamer, Thief, by Maria Dong

Are you looking for a fantasy for people who like mysteries and a mystery for people who love fantasy? Then Maria Dong’s new novel Liar, Dreamer, Thief might just be for you!

Science Fiction

Double Occupancy

“This is a disaster!” “What?” “This is an absolute disaster!”  “Did you say something?” Jessica Martin closed her laptop and put her head in her hands. Her old friend Todd, who was in her big bean chair in the corner, watching a movie on his phone, took out his earbuds. “What is it, dude? It’s not working?” “Oh, it’s working,” she said. She stared angrily at her invention, which stood in the middle of her room, the size and shape of a refrigerator. It was, in fact, her family’s old refrigerator, which she had stripped down and rebuilt. “It is working, Todd. It’s working perfectly. That is the problem.”

Fantasy

The Graphology of Hemorrhage

Rao Nawong, aide to Magician Tepwe Kodai, had not been on the hillside for long with her. The sky threatened rain on and off, and the air smelled of river poetry, of lakes with their scarves of reeds. Water would make their mission here, in the distant shadow of the Spiders’ fortress, more difficult, if not outright impossible. The Empire’s defeat of the upstart Spiders, whose rebellion had sparked a general conflagration in the southwest provinces, depended on the mission’s success. At the moment, Nawong found it hard to care. His world had narrowed to Kodai’s immediate needs, politics be damned.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Book Review: Tomorrow’s Parties, edited by Jonathan Strahan

If the word “anthropocene” elicits immediate feelings of gloom and doom, this new SF anthology is a good antidote. Let reviewer Arley Sorg tell you all about it!

Science Fiction

Therefore What the Multiverse Has Joined Together, Let No One Separate

Dear Next, You’ve seen the original picture. If you’re anything like me, you know it by heart. The image that came out of the first (and at the time of this writing, only) discovered white hole was a flower. It was gray and pixelated, but it was beautiful. When it was finished, I was invited to the vault to view the flower. Not because I was anyone important. I mean, I had millions of followers on social media, my content regularly went viral, and I had written a dozen best-selling books. But to the scientific community, I was a personality. An influencer. Not serious. Not like Yxa.

Fantasy

The Noon Witch Goes to Sound Planet

The Noon Witch is not a cat person. She likes the color purple, hates police procedurals, loves breakfast foods, thinks scented bath products and anchovy pizza are gross. Hates platform shoes. Hates walnuts in brownies. Used to like the electropop group all the girls at school like, until they used too much synth on their latest album, so now she hates them too. The Noon Witch isn’t an overcritical person. She’s just at that difficult age when you’re desperate to figure out who you are, so you lean too much on your likes and dislikes to try to cobble together what you think should be your personality.

Author Spotlight

Nonfiction

Book Review: Poster Girl, by Veronica Roth

If you’ve been thinking about how Big Brother is probably watching you, then you might want to check out Poster Girl, a new SF novel from Veronica Roth.